Heroes of Rhode Island Announced

Heroes presenting sponsor logo

Each year, the American Red Cross Rhode Island Chapter honors community heroes that make a difference in the lives of Rhode Islanders. This year’s honorees are profiled here. The Heroes Breakfast is Friday, October 24, at 7:30 a.m. at the Omni Providence Hotel in Providence. Emcee is NBC 10 News Anchor and Reporter Alison Bologna. For more information or tickets, click here.

Thank you


WORKPLACE HERO
CVS Health

CVS Health’s commitment to stronger, healthier communities aligns with the same commitment in the mission of the American Red Cross. By promoting better health, by fostering preparedness and by supporting organizations that improve the lives of people in the many communities they serve, CVS Health makes a life changing difference in many ways.

CVS Health’s commitment to building safer communities starts with its own offices, where a 200-member Emergency Response Team of employees volunteer their time to serve as first responders in the event of a disaster, evacuation or medical emergency at their workplace. Team members are trained and ready to help their colleagues, supporting a more resilient community by reducing risk and demand on outside resources that might be needed elsewhere in the early moments of an emergency.

Each year, the CVS Health Charity Classic generates funds for more than thirty Rhode Island charities. The CVS Health Downtown 5K highlights their commitment to health as well as raising funds for local charities. Through grants and volunteerism, CVS Health is changing communities for the better.

CVS Health donations of time, funds and products help to support the humanitarian work of the American Red Cross. In the wake of disasters, financial donations from CS Health have powered the Red Cross response in communities across the nation. And CVS Health employees have volunteered their time to build comfort kits from products donated by the company. These kits provide the Red Cross with a resource to offer people displaced by disaster the basics that become so important when they may have lost everything but the clothes on their backs.

“Among the nominees for the Workplace Hero award, we sought an organization known for groundbreaking leadership and longstanding support of the community at a local and national level,” said American Red Cross Rhode Island Chapter Executive Director Paula Montgomery. “CVS Health demonstrates a deep and thoughtful commitment to supporting people and organizations that are building a better world.”

LIFE SAVING HERO
Timothy D. Crandall and the East Greenwich Fire Department

East Greenwich High School student Anthony Petrone is alive today because of fast action and emergency care for sudden cardiac arrest.

On March 31, the East Greenwich Fire Department received an emergency call from East Greenwich High school involving an individual suffering from active seizures. Rescue personnel arrived to find student Anthony Petrone unresponsive, notTim Crandall & East Greenwich Fire Department breathing and without a pulse on the gymnasium floor. East Greenwich High School Athletic Trainer Timothy Crandall was caring for the student. When notified that a student had passed out in the gym, Crandall rushed to the scene. When he arrived, he realized that it was a much more serious situation. Crandall immediately implemented emergency protocol by providing CPR and defibrillation, using an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Crandall’s 11 years as an Emergency Medical Technician in Connecticut and the American Red Cross CPR recertification training he has taken every two years since no doubt contributed to his swift and life-saving reaction.

Rescue took over CPR and continued defibrillation, working to revive Petrone. As a result of the quick thinking and effectiveness of all involved, Petrone was initially treated and then quickly transported to Kent County Hospital. “The stars aligned that day. Everyone was in the right place at the right time,” said East Greenwich Fire Department Lieutenant William Purcell.

In an interview with the North East Independent, Petrone’s mother, Keelin Petrone, credited Tim Crandall’s initial response and rapid care with saving her son’s life. “Without being shocked [with a defibrillator], he wouldn’t have made it. There is no way to thank Tim enough for what he did.”

Presented by:

Amica Mutual Insurance Company logo.

Amica Mutual Insurance Company 

MILITARY HERO
Stephen & Rosemarie Moretti

Two military parents are using their personal experience to help other military families cope with the stress of deployments.

Stephen and Rosemarie Moretti began volunteering in 2004 when their son, SSG Steven Moretti, joined the 169th Military Police Company in the Army National Guard. They volunteered because they wanted to help the families during the upcoming deployment to Iraq (2007 to 2008) and discovered how rewarding volunteering can be. They continued Stephen & Rosemarie Morettivolunteering with the unit through a second deployment to Afghanistan (2012 to 2013).

During this period, Stephen and Rosemarie served as members of the Unit’s Family Readiness Group. The Morettis worked tirelessly while the soldiers served abroad to ensure that each and every military family member was well taken care of. Their efforts on behalf of the Family Readiness Group were instrumental to the Unit’s success once deployed to Afghanistan. Stephen and Rosemarie’s individual support of the Unit’s initiatives back home, as well as their never-ending care for the family members of deployed soldiers helped to keep the soldiers mission focused.

The Morettis’ volunteer contributions also include the Family Assistance Center, the Rhode Island Military Lounge at TF Green Airport and Blue Star Mothers. Their volunteer duties involve assisting at various 169th family events throughout the year and making monthly “check in” calls to those who have a family member deployed.

Stephen and Rosemarie feel that their experience with having a deployed family member makes them uniquely equipped to support others in the same situation. “We plan on volunteering forever! It feels right for us and it feels good to hopefully make a difference in the lives of our military and their families.”

Presented by:Webster Bank logo. Click to visit Webster Bank website.

Webster Bank

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE HERO

Rhode Island Urban Search and Rescue Task Force

The Rhode Island Urban Search & Rescue (RIUSAR) Task Force is a volunteer Urban Search and Rescue Team that is authorized by the Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency (RIEMA) to respond to natural or man-made disasters involving building collapses that require specialized search skills and tools. RIUSAR has responded to various local emergencies including the floods of 210, Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Irene, as well as various structure collapses due to snow and ice.

The goal in developing a local Urban Search and Rescue Team in Rhode Island is to assist RIEMA in responding more quickly to major disasters than would be the case if Rhode Island strictly relied on federal USAR teams. RIUSAR Rescue RI Urban Search and Rescue TeamOperations Manager John Cagno, Jr., told a reporter from WPRI last April that “It would probably take a federal team to get out the door and to respond in maybe three, four hours. We can probably get to anywhere in the state in probably 30 to 40 minutes after an incident occurs.”

RIUSAR is a Task Force comprised of five major functional elements: Search, Rescue, Medical, Logistics and Planning. Volunteers are drawn from the fire, medical, law enforcement and engineering sectors. RIUSAR members have access to and are trained in using advanced life-saving equipment that would not be practical for many local response agencies to have. The Team seeks to staff each of its approximately 70 positions two-deep, thereby increasing response capability. RIUSAR is also capable of deploying a smaller 34 person team, or specialty teams to suit the needs of the situation.

Members of RIUSAR have the skills and training to respond, but it’s their motivation to volunteer for a complex mission that sets them apart. “If you don’t have the passion, genuine passion, then you don’t belong here,” Cagno says.

Presented by:Clean Care of New England logo. Click to visit Clean Care website.

Clean Care of New England

SPIRIT OF THE RED CROSS
Rev. John D. Wheeler

Reverend John Wheeler blends his pastoral role and his commitment to preparedness to help keep Rhode Islanders safer in emergencies.

Reverend Wheeler has served as pastor at the Stony Lane Baptist Church, in North Kingstown for the past 20 years. Beyond his role with the church, Reverend Wheeler devotes significant time to volunteer work in support of a number of faith organizations, including CareNetRI, LoveRI and the Ministry Training Network of Southeastern New England, where he is Board President.Rev. John Wheeler

Reverend Wheeler is also involved in organizations that support community preparedness and disaster response, melding his role in the faith community with the work of others committed to community resilience. He is a Council member of New England Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD), which helps to mobilize and coordinate faith-based and community organizations to respond to disaster-caused needs. He is a team leader with the Disaster Behavioral Response Team of Rhode Island, which helps to provide emotional care in disasters. And Reverend Wheeler also serves as a Shelter Manager and Disaster Institute Instructor for the American Red Cross.

Reverend Wheeler has been active with the Red Cross since the 2010 Rhode Island floods and has taken on many roles, including the important tasks of recruiting and training fellow volunteers. One of his most fulfilling roles is that of Disaster Institute Instructor, in which he conducts a workshop called “Helping the Helper.” The workshop helps volunteers address compassion fatigue, stress and personal disaster preparedness for Red Cross volunteers who are preparing to deploy or who have deployed to assist in disaster responses. Reverend Wheeler asks, “Who helps the helpers? I honestly believe God has given me a real passion and desire to help these people because they are always giving.”

Presented by:Cox Media logo. Click to visit Cox Media website.

Cox Media

THINK INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW DOESN’T MATTER TO YOU? THINK AGAIN!

photo: American Red Cross

photo: American Red Cross

 

by Emily Esposito

According to a recent American Red Cross Survey, only about half of adults and less than a quarter of young Americans are familiar with the Geneva Conventions and International Humanitarian Law (IHL). Maybe even more surprising, more than half of adults and our nation’s youth think that torturing enemy soldiers is acceptable at least some of the time. And more than a third of Americans (young people included) believe that torturing a captured American soldier is acceptable at least sometimes.

You might ask why IHL should matter to you or if it should matter that most Americans don’t know what IHL is. Americans serving in the military or living abroad could be protected under IHL. The American Red Cross has information and resources to help you understand what IHL is and how it affects you.

What is IHL? IHL is a set of rules that regulates the conduct of armed conflict to protect civilians, aid workers, prisoners of war, and wounded soldiers. Most of these rules are listed in the Geneva Conventions, drafted after WWII and ratified by most countries, including the United States.

Does IHL Matter?  IHL protects people affected by conflict across the globe. While fighting and war on American soil hasn’t taken place in years, that doesn’t mean Americans aren’t immune to conflict and war crimes. Most of us know at least one American soldier who is or could be deployed to fight in a conflict abroad or an American living abroad (think study abroad students, aid workers, diplomats, etc.) that could all be protected under IHL should a conflict erupt.

If armed conflict broke out in your country, civilians not taking part in the conflict (likely your own family) would be protected against violence, would not be taken hostage and could receive aid from a Red Cross society. Do you have family members or friends in the military? Under the Geneva Conventions, wounded soldiers would be given treatment and never tortured.

The U.S., along with many nations around the world, has ratified the Geneva Conventions and many of the subsequent protocols that update the Conventions. Whatever your views on torture or IHL, the U.S. has agreed to abide by certain principles under the Conventions. These principles help to preserve human life and protect civilians around the world. Humanitarian principles are at the core of the Red Cross mission; the Red Cross works to raise awareness of and respect for International Humanitarian Law through education programs and activities. To learn more about IHL, visit the American Red Cross IHL web page.

To volunteer for the Red Cross visit http://www.redcross.org/ri/volunteer

Emily Esposito is an International and Military Services volunteer with the American Red Cross Connecticut and Rhode Island Region. 

Tropical Storm Arthur Reminds Us to Prepare

By Paula Montgomery, Executive Director, American Red Cross Rhode Island Chapter

While we all look forward to the holiday weekend, Tropical Storm Arthur has formed in the Atlantic off the coast of Florida, becoming the first named storm of Hurricane season. Although the storm is not forecast to bring hurricane conditions our area, Arthur is a reminder that we are vulnerable to hurricanes and severe weather here in New England. So, while we may have a slightly wet Fourth of July, consider this an opportunity to check your readiness without the pressure of an impending storm.

You don’t have to think too far back to remember some major storms in our area. From the February 2013 blizzard, to Hurricane Sandy, the October snowstorm of 2011 and Hurricane Irene, we have seen weather disrupt our daily lives and cause serious property damage.

Some of these storms brought storm surges to coastal areas or downed trees. In several cases, prolonged power outages affected many communities. So take a few minutes to think about the impacts you faced at home or at work and consider how you can make yourself more resilient in the face of future storms.

Planning now will help you better cope with emergencies. The American Red Cross has information and tools to help you prepare. Most tasks are simple and can be broken down into smaller steps that won’t be a burden. Start with the three most basic building blocks – a kit, a plan and knowledge about the risks in your community:

  • Create an emergency preparedness kit with food and water, and other basic supplies for each family member to last at least three days. Remember to include essential medications, copies of important documents and special items for children and pets. 
  • Plan what to do in case you are separated from your family during an emergency and what to do if you have to evacuate. Coordinate with your child’s school, your work and community’s emergency plans.
  • Be informed about what disasters or emergencies may occur where you live, work, play and pray, and how to respond as safely as possible. Find out how local officials will contact you during a disaster and how you will get important information. 

To help you through those three steps, here are some resources: 

  • Download any of the Red Cross free disaster-specific mobile apps—particularly the Hurricane and First Aid apps—to get lifesaving preparedness information in the palm of your hand before and during emergencies. Red Cross apps can be found in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for Android by searching for American Red Cross or by going to redcross.org/mobileapps
  • Visit the Preparedness section of redcross.org for life-saving information, tools and tips to help you prepare for emergencies.  
  • Get free checklists and downloadable tips at redcross.org/preparednessfastfacts.
  • Use the Red Cross Ready Rating™ Program (readyrating.org). It’s a free, web-based program designed to help businesses, organizations and schools to become better prepared. Members complete a self assessment of their current readiness level and receive immediate, customized feedback with resources to improve preparedness. First Aid Emergency Drills help businesses train their staff for emergencies and disasters.  

Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane or other disaster. A few simple steps now will pay big dividends when the next storm hits.

 

Are You Ready for Hurricane Season?

Disaster Mitigation TV PSAs shoot

Volunteer Jason Harris writes today’s blog post. Jason, a new volunteer with the Red Cross, is putting some of his personal experience with hurricanes and his interest to good use in suggesting some basic ideas for personal preparedness.

Hurricane season began June 1. Are you ready? Have you made a Hurricane Preparedness List? Everyone should have a plan, no matter if you live on the coast or inland, because power outages can happen anywhere. I know it can seem a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. I’ve done it and will give you some tips to prepare based on my personal experiences. For details, I will provide links to online resources, because if I write about everything this blog post will start looking like a college term paper.

Check and organize your supplies in a space where they're easy to reach.

Check and organize supplies in an easy to reach space.

To get started, I thought about how I had prepared for storms in the past. I had gotten my water, batteries and non-perishable items together, but really not anything else. I know I didn’t get enough water to sustain me, my wife and our two cats. You don’t want to forget about your animals. They will need food and water as well. Before doing research for this post, I didn’t know you should have a three-day supply of water on-hand. This means a gallon of water per day per family member. During Hurricane Irene, my wife and I were without power for nine days. I used water from our bathtub, which we filled before losing power, to flush the toilet. I also retrieved water from the creek down the street to sustain our water supply. I didn’t drink the water from the creek, but it did come in handy for toilet water, stretching our drinking water supply. Remember also that you don’t have to purchase bottled water. You can easily fill empty containers or soda bottles before a storm.

Disaster Mitigation

Take time to know your risks and make a plan.

When you put together your non-perishable food items such as ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits and vegetables, make sure you have a manual can opener to open those cans since electric ones won’t work without power.

Another good device to have on hand is a multi-tool. The tool’s name says it all. These multi-tools can include a can opener, knife, pliers and a screwdriver to name just a few of the items you can find in this one awesome tool. If MacGyver was still airing on television, he would have replaced his Swiss Army knife with a modern multi-tool.

You will also need flashlights, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio and an extra supply of batteries for the flashlights and radio. If you have rechargeable batteries, make sure they are charged up before the storm hits. Make sure cell phones are charged as well. You may want to invest in a portable power station, the kind advertised for jumping car batteries. Many of these units come with an LED work light and USB power port, and can be useful for charging cell phones and tablet computers. I have used mine more to charge my cellphone and my wife’s phone more than to jump my car battery.

And here’s another tip that can easily be overlooked. Make sure to have cash on hand because if the power goes out, credit cards and ATMs will be useless.

My wife and I weathered our nine days after Hurricane Irene with a lot of books, flashlights and trips to our families’ houses, as they owned generators. We learned a lot, and will be better prepared next time.

If you want to make a plan, check out redcross.org for more information. The Red Cross web page on Hurricanes will provide information to help you prepare for and cope with a hurricane. And there are lots of links to other resources like the Red Cross Hurricane App for your phone.

Young People Find Great Volunteer Opportunities at the Red Cross; Adult Mentors Help Them Grow!

by Keysha Dorch, American Red Cross Rhode Island Chapter Volunteer

Rhode Island Youth Corps photo

Members of the Rhode Island Chapter recently prepared bags of personal care and comfort items for the Totes of Hope program that helps provide support to military veterans.

Young people wanting to be involved in their communities, build character and learn leadership skills are finding great opportunities to serve with the Red Cross Youth Corps. And the Red Cross is looking for adult leaders to help support the increased activity of the Red Cross Youth Corps in Rhode Island.

American Red Cross Youth Services are essential to the fulfillment of the Red Cross mission. Youth Corps volunteers are engaged in all aspects of the Red Cross: Preparedness, Health & Safety Services; Blood Services; Emergency Services; Service to Armed Forces; and International Services.

The Rhode Island Chapter is looking for adult volunteers to educate, encourage and empower youth to be role models in their communities so that as current and future leaders, they can further the mission and fundamental principles of the Red Cross and touch more lives nationwide and around the world. “Our mission at the Red Cross is to build stronger, safer, more resilient communities,” said Red Cross Director of Volunteer Resources and Youth Services Jason Campagnone. “With the Youth Corps, we strengthen communities by developing stronger, more engaged youth.”

American Red Cross Rhode Island Chapter Youth Council Chairman David Vargas credits his involvement in the Red Cross Youth Corps for his increase in integrity and willingness to help people. For Vargas, Red Cross Youth Services provides challenging yet attainable goals that motivate and provide a sense of accomplishment and community. Volunteering with the Red Cross has “helped me learn the real definition of commitment and dedication,” Vargas says. “The Red Cross also has also let me see the importance of volunteering and how one person can make a difference.”

As Youth Advisors, volunteers will be expected to ensure that youth volunteers are fully engaged in their assigned Red Cross activities, educate the community on the youth services aspect of the Red Cross mission and expand the youth initiative within schools and colleges. These adult mentors/advisors need to be reliable, supportive and dedicated to helping build the future of the American Red Cross. This is a great opportunity for young professionals who want to build leadership and networks and for others with experience to share in shaping future leaders.

For information on how to become a Youth Advisor, please visit www.redcrossyouth.org or contact Jason Campagnone by phone at (401) 831-7701 extension 101 or by email at Jason.Campagnone@redcross.org.

HELP NOW: BECOME A RED CROSS DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH VOLUNTEER

If you are a licensed mental health professional with a desire to help people, the American Red Cross has a fulfilling volunteer opportunity for you. Join us to support people who have been impacted by residential fires, disasters and other emergencies.

American Red Cross disaster response includes an important emotional support and mental health component aimed at helping people to cope with the emotionally difficult nature of disasters and to begin their own recovery.

There are a variety of ways to help and time commitments to choose from. The first step? Register and learn more here.

American Red Cross Helping Two People After Coventry Fire

The American Red Cross is helping two adults with emergency housing and food needs after a fire Monday on Albro Lane in Coventry.

The Red Cross is also providing comfort kits, containing age and gender appropriate personal care items such as toothbrushes, deodorant, shaving supplies and other items a family might not have been able to gather in the rush to escape the fire.  Children’s kits include a stuffed toy.

American Red Cross disaster assistance is free of charge, a gift made possible by generous donations and the work of volunteers.  For more information about the Red Cross and how you can help, visit www.redcross.org.

American Red Cross Helping Three People After Providence Fire

The American Red Cross is helping two adults and one child with emergency housing and food needs after they were displaced by a fire today on Swift Street in Providence.

The Red Cross is also providing comfort kits, containing age and gender appropriate personal care items such as toothbrushes, deodorant, shaving supplies and other items a family might not have been able to gather in the rush to escape the fire.  Children’s kits include a stuffed toy.

American Red Cross disaster assistance is free of charge, a gift made possible by generous donations and the work of volunteers.  For more information about the Red Cross and how you can help, visit www.redcross.org.

 

Red Cross Helping Two People After North Smithfield Fire

The American Red Cross is helping two adults with emergency housing, food and clothing needs after a fire today on Pond House Road in North Smithfield.

The Red Cross is also providing comfort kits, containing age and gender appropriate personal care items such as toothbrushes, deodorant, shaving supplies and other items a family might not have been able to gather in the rush to escape the fire.  Children’s kits include a stuffed toy.

American Red Cross disaster assistance is free of charge, a gift made possible by generous donations and the work of volunteers.  For more information about the Red Cross and how you can help, visit www.redcross.org.

 

Red Cross Babysitter Training Offered on Presidents’ Day

The American Red Cross is offering its Babysitter’s Training class on Monday, February 18. The course will be offered at the Red Cross office in Providence.

“The Presidents’ Day school holiday is a great opportunity to give your children this important training,” said American Red Cross spokesperson Paul Shipman. “The skills your child learns in this class will help them if they want to earn money babysitting, but will also provide skills to help them watch younger siblings and to be safer at home.”

Designed for young people ages 11 to 15, “this course prepares you to become a great babysitter – and shows parents that you take this responsibility seriously,” Shipman said.

Participants gain practical skills and confidence through video presentations, hands-on activities and classroom discussion. Students will also leave with resources to help them get started as Babysitters, including résumé and business card templates; “How to Ace an Interview” guide; safety inspection checklist; and more.

Participants will learn how to:

•           Supervise children and infants

•           Perform basic child-care such as diapering, feeding and dressing

•           Choose safe, age-appropriate games and toys

•           Handle bedtime and discipline issues

•           Identify safety hazards and prevent injuries

•           Care for common injuries such as burns, cuts and bee stings

•           Communicate effectively with parents

•           Find and interview for babysitting jobs

Classes start at 9:00 a.m. and end at 4:00 p.m. The class will be held at the Red Cross office in Providence. Cost for the course is $85. The course fee includes a Babysitter’s Training Handbook, Emergency Reference Guide and CD-ROM. After successful completion, students will receive Babysitter’s Certificate. To register call 1-800-REDCROSS (733-2767) or register online at www.redcross.org.